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Top 99 Grantmakers in Palm Beach County

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Thursday, July 18, 2019

As a Funding Information Network partner, Nonprofits First subscribes to The Foundation Center – a database of over 140,000 grantmakers. Does your nonprofit have strong relationships with your granting partners? Are you connected to foundations that align with your nonprofit’s mission and vision? There is always work to be done in this area - that's why it's called development!

Grant-seeking is a process and building relationships with funders takes time and effort. On average nonprofits in the United States receive about 16% of their overall funding from Foundations - with a majority (70%) of revenue coming from individual donors. (Source: Giving USA) Grants are small but important piece of a diversified revenue stream. 

Here are the top grantmakers based in Palm Beach County that fund programs in Palm Beach County: (Source: Foundation Center)

1.       Community Foundation For Palm Beach And Martin Counties

2.       Quantum Foundation

3.       E. M. Lynn Foundation

4.       The Bay Branch Foundation

5.       Lost Tree Village Charitable Foundation

6.       Lattner Family Foundation, Inc.

7.       C. Olsen 1990 Private Foundation

8.       Frank J. Lewis Foundation, Inc.

9.       Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, Inc.

10.   Walter & Adi Blum Foundation, Inc.

11.   The Celia L. And Victor W. Farris Foundation

12.   Sidney Kohl Family Foundation

13.   Palm Health Foundation, Inc.

14.   Libra Foundation, Inc.

15.   J.M. Rubin Foundation, Inc.

16.   The William H. Pitt Foundation, Inc.

17.   HE Hill Foundation

18.   P. J. Callahan Foundation Inc.

19.   Raymond Zimmerman Family Foundation

20.   C. Kenneth And Laura Baxter Foundation, Inc.

21.   The David Minkin Foundation

22.   United Way Of Palm Beach County

23.   Marshall E. Rinker, Sr. Foundation, Inc.

24.   The Fortin Foundation Of Florida, Inc.

25.   R. A. Ritter Foundation

26.   Halperin Foundation Inc.

27.   Scaife Family Foundation

28.   Mestal Foundation, Inc.

29.   Marcy And Leona Chanin Foundation, Inc.

30.   Lawrence J. & Florence A. Degeorge Charitable Trust

31.   Forrest C. & Frances H. Lattner Foundation

32.   Kristine Olsen Private Foundation

33.   Michael & Annie Falk Foundation

34.   Eleanor Patterson Reeves Foundation, Inc.

35.   The Geo Group Foundation, Inc.

36.   The John F. Scarpa Foundation

37.   Harvey And Phyllis Sandler Foundation, Inc.

38.   The Raymond L. Golden Family Foundation, Inc.

39.   J. Ira And Nicki Harris Family Foundation, Inc.

40.   The Mary Alice Fortin Foundation

41.   The Liman Foundation, Inc.

42.   Sun Capital Partners Foundation

43.   Nextera Energy Foundation, Inc.

44.   Sandelman Foundation

45.   The Azeez Foundation

46.   The Edward & Lucille Kimmel Foundation, Inc.

47.   Denise And William Meyer Foundation

48.   Edward T. Bedford Foundation

49.   Kessler Family Foundation

50.   R. Cathleen Cox Mcfarlane Charitable Foundation, Inc.

51.   The Pechter Family Foundation

52.   Mark And Mary Freitas Frietas Foundation

53.   McNulty Charitable Foundation, Inc.

54.   Johnson Scholarship Foundation

55.   Jewish Federation Of Palm Beach County

56.   The Gertrude E. Skelly Charitable Foundation

57.   Hufty Foundation

58.   Harcourt M. And Virginia W. Sylvester Foundation, Inc.

59.   Mildred & Abner Levine Family Foundation

60.   Marshall And Vera Lea Rinker Foundation, Inc.

61.   The Selma And Irving Ettenberg Foundation

62.   Richard L. & Lois S. Werner Family Foundation

63.   The Stiles-Nicholson Foundation

64.   The Joan B. And Richard L. Barovick Family Foundation

65.   The Rothschild Family Foundation Inc.

66.   The Nancy Brinker Charitable Foundation

67.   Richard S. Johnson Family Foundation

68.   Kanders Foundation, Inc.

69.   The Bruce E. And Robbi S. Toll Foundation

70.   Daelansa Foundation

71.   Alan H. & Harriet L. Miller Foundation, Inc.

72.   Gubelmann Family Foundation, Inc.

73.   Sam W. Klein Charitable Foundation Inc.

74.   Gary Peters Family Foundation, Inc.

75.   The Isenberg Family Charitable Trust

76.   The Connors Foundation, Inc.

77.   James Held & Kenn Karakul Charitable Foundation Inc.

78.   Samuel C. Cantor Charitable Trust

79.   Jerome & Anne C. Fisher Charitable Foundation

80.   Norman Shulevitz Foundation, Inc.

81.   Cornelia T. Bailey Charitable Trust

82.   Whitehall Foundation, Inc.

83.   Eda And Cliff Viner Family Foundation, Inc.

84.   Garvy Family Foundation, Inc.

85.   The Marvin H. Davidson Foundation, Inc.

86.   The Thomas C. Quick Charitable Trust Dated December 29, 1986

87.   Make A Difference Foundation Inc.

88.   Sidney And Jacqueline Wolgin Foundation, Inc.

89.   The Annette & Jack Friedland Charitable Foundation Inc.

90.   The W. Bradford Ingalls Charitable Foundation

91.   The Stanton Family Foundation

92.   J.C. Foundation

93.   Kate Obstgarten Private Foundation

94.   Louis & Anne Green Family Foundation

95.   The Steven E. Bernstein Family Foundation Inc.

96.   Levitetz Family Foundation, Inc

97.   Donald A. Burns Foundation Inc.

98.   Alice Busch Gronewaldt Foundation Inc.

99.   Richard And Peggy Greenfield Foundation

 

To reserve the Grant Research Center at Nonprofits First, call 561-214-7435.

Tags:  Charities  Fundraising  GrantsGiving USA 2018  Nonprofit Philanthropy 

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Member Spotlight: The Guatemalan-Maya Center and Achieve

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Tuesday, May 28, 2019

The recent Great Give was a boon for The Guatemalan-Maya Center (accredited nonprofit organization and member), which brought in nearly $40,000 during the one-day fundraising event.

 

The organization worked with the marketing company Achieve (our affiliate member) in raising the money through social media, e-blasts, and a string of volunteers.

 

How did they do it?

 

We asked Erica Linguanti, Achieve’s director of marketing, to explain their strategies for the campaign – and describe how similar strategies can help other nonprofits in various fundraising efforts.

 

It’s our May Member spotlight.

 

 

1) How did Achieve help The Guatemalan-Maya Center raise $38,787 during the Great Give?

 

Erica Linguanti: We developed a multi-channel campaign strategy to help The Guatemalan-Maya Center meet their goal of raising $30,000 to expand their after school program. Here are some of the key tactics we used to support our overall strategy:

 

1. Identified a clear/realistic fundraising goal. In the case of The Guatemalan-Maya Center, instead of simply having a monetary goal, we equated the goal to the impact: “Help 30 kids succeed in school this year.”

 

2. Updated their website to be mobile responsive and implemented a new donation platform for pre and post donations. It was important that their donation tool was both mobile friendly and trackable through Facebook conversion tracking.

 

3. Developed an email messaging strategy to leverage storytelling before, during, and after the Great Give to encourage support.

 

4. Utilized both paid and organic social media to generate awareness and garner donations. Paid social advertising was especially critical because it allowed us to leverage a variety of retargeting tactics to best reach our key audiences. To really succeed on social you can’t rely on a few organic posts anymore. On Facebook, typically only about 1-3% of your followers will ever organically see your content - and it usually takes at least 5-7 messaging “touch points” before a user will ever consider taking action. For better or worse, Facebook (and Instagram) have become very pay-to-play platforms making your organic social strategy only as effective as your paid social strategy (and vice versa).

 

5. Created phone scripts volunteers could use to reach out to past donors and encourage participation in the Great Give. Sometimes accomplishing fundraising goals takes a village, so we wanted to setup volunteers for success!

 

2) Was there anything during the Great Give event that didn’t go as planned?

 

Erica Linguanti: Initially we were unable to secure a donor match - which was a key tactic in our overall strategy. After this setback, we pivoted to a new messaging strategy. Then, a little over one week before the Great Give, our plans changed again after a $5,000 donor match was secured. While we were thrilled to have a match to help incentivize donors, the last-minute match meant we needed to change our messaging strategy again. With any type of marketing campaign, it’s important to remain flexible! 

 

3) What advice would you give other nonprofits about raising money during the Great Give or other events?

 

Erica Linguanti: The biggest pieces of advice I would give to other nonprofits looking to raise money during the Great Give (or other pinnacle events) would be to:

 

1. Start early! #GivingTuesday is coming in November. Ideally, you should be planning your strategy no later than July/August.

 

2. Keep your goal(s) simple and tangible. It also helps to humanize your ask by attaching money to actual impact. For example, with The Guatemalan-Maya Center, our goal was to “Help 30 kids succeed in school this year” vs. “Help us raise $30,000.”

 

3. Leverage paid social media advertising to extend your digital reach and get in front of new audiences.

 

4. Remember that for “day of giving” events - it’s not just about the amount of money raised. Giving days are great opportunities to bring in new donors for your organization that you can cultivate over time (and hopefully turn into loyal donors).

 

Learn more about The Guatemalan-Maya Center here.

 

Learn more about Achieve here.

 

If your nonprofit has a great story to tell, contact Charlotte Gill at Nonprofits First: 561-910-3891 or cgill@nonprofitsfirst.org.

Tags:  Affiliate Consultant  Charitable Giving  Charities  Collaborations  Fundraising  Membership  Nonprofit  Nonprofit Philanthropy 

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Member Spotlight: Women’s Foundation of Florida & Philanthropy Tank

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Monday, March 25, 2019

Nonprofits First offers many services to the nonprofit community – including the ability to rent space in our West Palm Beach office.

 

Two organizations are taking advantage of that, using our space to maximize the opportunity to be “next door” to our many educational workshops.

 

Those two agencies are: Women’s Foundation of Florida and Philanthropy Tank.

 

They are the focus of our March member spotlight.

 

 

Women’s Foundation of Florida and Philanthropy Tank have different missions, but they have many similarities. They are both small but mighty organizations looking to grow.

 

We asked the staff of both organizations to tell us about their organizations and why they support Nonprofits First.

 

1) Explain briefly how your organization helps people in Palm Beach County/South Florida.

 

Judith Selzer, co-founder and president of Women’s Foundation of Florida: The Women’s Foundation of Florida empowers women and girls to be leaders so we can change the world. Our leadership programs and micro-grants invest in challenging the status quo, lifting up innovative ideas and leaning into the magic of women’s vision for the world around us. Check us out at WomensFoundationFL.org.

 

Mathew Avila, project assistant at Philanthropy Tank: The Philanthropy Tank is an organization that challenges, empowers, and equips the next generation of CHANGEmakers in grades 8-12 to develop and implement a sustainable social service, activism, or entrepreneurship idea that aims to solve a problem in the community.

 

We have over 20 active projects that cover a vast range of topics. One of our 2018 winners, Surface 71, aims to reduce plastic use, improve marine habitats, and advocate that water is life. This past month, Surface 71 successfully lobbied to eliminate plastic straws and stirrers at local businesses and restaurants in West Palm Beach. Their success has even earned them a private tour of the White House and the U.S. Capitol by Senator Marco Rubio.

 

Some of our most recent 2019 winners include groups like the Mayan Girls and Code Autism. The Mayan Girls are a group of young women that translate and market important content relating to health, severe weather, and community updates from English and Spanish to various indigenous Mayan languages in the Lake Worth area. Code Autism is a project that teaches computer programming classes to autistic children from the Els Center for Autism. These are just a fraction of the numerous projects that the Philanthropy Tank has helped support in the past four years. In total, the Philanthropy Tank has impacted over 300,000 lives in Palm Beach County through the various CHANGEmaker programs. Check us out at philanthropytank.org

 

 

2) Why did you decide to be housed in the office of Nonprofits First? What’s the advantage of being there?

 

Judith Selzer: We are thrilled to utilize office space and technical assistance from Nonprofits First because this is an organization that reflects our values and mission. We both believe in public service, leadership and collaboration. It’s a perfect fit!

 

Mathew Avila: The Nonprofits First family recognizes what it takes to construct and maintain an organization that is only starting to bury its roots into the ground. Since the Philanthropy Tank is a young organization, it makes complete sense that we surround ourselves with experienced professionals who know how to develop nonprofits.

 

Over the past two years, the Philanthropy Tank staff has attended numerous informational and collaborative workshops. We walk away with innovative tools and advice from these workshops that make all the difference in the world. The variety of topics covered is endless. Sharing an office with Nonprofits First is a wonderful experience.

 

If your nonprofit has a great story to tell, contact Charlotte Gill at Nonprofits First: 561-910-3891 or cgill@nonprofitsfirst.org.

Tags:  Charities  Collaborations  Cultivate  Leadership  Membership  Nonprofit 

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Member Spotlight: Digital Vibez

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Wednesday, January 30, 2019

January Spotlight: Digital Vibez

Making the world a better place - isn't that what nonprofits are all about? 

Digital Vibez certainly thinks so. Over the years, this nonprofit in Palm Beach County has literally made thousands of underserved children move toward a healthier lifestyle.

Along the way, the agency won our 2018 Hats Off Nonprofit Awards for “Nonprofit of the Year (Small category).” And they were one of the shining stars in our 101 For The 501 program in 2017.

And so, Digital Vibez is our January spotlight.

 

After a group of young people held him up at gunpoint and robbed him, Wilford Romelus set out on a new mission in life. With his skills in technology and his brother’s skills in dancing, Romelus decided it was time to put their experience to work and give young people a more meaningful, less destructive avenues to express their emotions. 

 

That is how Digital Vibez was born.   

 

“So many kids get into trouble because they can’t express their feelings,” Romelus said. “I knew one of the kids who robbed me and I knew if we can change the way he expresses himself, he can make better choices.”

 

Romelus, his brother, Wilbert, and other supporters began organizing a variety of activities and classes for children with the goal of maintaining a healthy and well-balanced lifestyle. Their focus was to serve all of Palm Beach County, concentrating particularly in the zip codes marked as high-risk by Children's Services Council of Palm Beach County.

 

The thinking was, by giving youth an opportunity to express themselves in a safe place, they would channel their emotions away from destructive behaviors.

 

It worked.

 

In the past eight years, Digital Vibez has partnered with after-school and community organizations to deliver engaging fitness, computer literacy, mentoring, and other programs to many thousands of children. Its messages are aligned with countywide health and wellness initiatives promoted through the Palm Beach County School District, the Florida Department of Health Palm Beach, and other affiliated organizations.

 

The group’s wellness workshops have expanded from 10 sites in 2015 to 20 sites in 2017. And the organization’s annual revenue increased from $50,000 in 2014 to close to $400,000 in 2017/18.

 

In addition to the Hats Off Nonprofit Awards, Digital Vibez has also received the Champion Award from Diabetes Coalition of Palm Beach County.

 

And one more thing: the number of steps children have taken collectively through the fitness and other programs has exceeded 2.6 million.

 

The success came largely from Romelus’ passion for connecting with children. Romelus, who is 32, was born in Haiti and grew up in rural Immokalee, Florida. He had always wanted to better his community.

 

Digital Vibez also took off because of support from funders and other donors. In addition, it helped that Romelus learned many strategies for running a nonprofit by completing Nonprofit First’s 101 For The 501 program, which is targeted for nonprofit start-ups.

 

“Many kids imitate what they see and we just need to give them better choices,” he said.

 

Learn more about Digital Vibez here.

 

And to truly understand their programs, check out one of their videos here.

 

If you want Nonprofits First to spotlight your nonprofit, please contact Charlotte Gill, our director of development and business strategies, here.

 

 

Tags:  Charities  Leadership  Membership  Nonprofit  Storytelling 

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Member Spotlight: War on Hunger Collaborative

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Tuesday, October 30, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Spotlight on Feeding Palm Beach County’s Hungry Residents

 

People often say that nonprofits work in silos and don’t work well together. This year, the “War on Hunger” collaborative in Palm Beach County proved them wrong.

 

The massive food distribution effort won the 2018 Community Collaboration Award during our Hats Off Nonprofits Awards event in October.

 

So it’s only fitting that we highlight the collaborative in our monthly spotlight on the extraordinary work of nonprofits.

 

Here is the story of how the group reached hundreds of thousands of hunger residents in our community.

 

 

The task was enormous: hand-delivering 3,864,168 snacks, in 214,676 “white boxes,” to nearly 215,000 Palm Beach County residents struggling with poverty and hunger, in a two-month period.

 

It was a job for the military or another big government agency, right?

 

No, this was done locally by a collaboration of 19 key public, private, and nonprofit organizations with the clear goal of feeding every hungry child, adult and senior in Palm Beach County during the spring of 2018.

 

The massive outreach effort started when Farm Share alerted Living Hungry, a West Palm Beach-based group fighting hunger, to the fact that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was looking for agencies to accept 100 truckloads of expiring “hurricane-shelter snack boxes.” If the food was accepted, it would need to be distributed fast to avoid the expiration date of July.

 

“We are going to need more partners, more people!” Maura Plante, founder of Living Hungry, said at the time.

 

And so, Plante contacted Palm Beach County School Board Member Erica Whitfield, along with other public sector organizations including Houston Tate and Ruth Morguillansky from the Palm Beach County Office of Community Revitalization who recruited the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office. Together, with Michael Farver, South Florida Hunger Coalition they followed a creative, strategic planning process and set out to build an outreach collaborative, with each partner playing a specific, mission-critical role.

 

The “War on Hunger” collaborative, as it became known, also involved: Nonprofits First, Sysco Southeast Florida, Restoration Bridge, Daughters of the American Revolution, The Palm Beach Post, Cox Media, The Girl Scouts of Southeast Florida, Glades Initiative, and ARC of the Glades, as well as other organizations from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors with support from the Everglades Trust. Additionally, many municipalities helped out with logistics and distribution, including City of Riviera Beach, City of Delray Beach, and cities of Belle Glade, South Bay and Pahokee.

 

Together, they engaged dozens of local charities, churches, agencies, businesses, girl scout troops, civic groups, service providers, organizations, school principals, teachers, coaches, police officers, and neighbors to get the food out. The Palm Beach County Office of Community Revitalization distributed 2.2 million meals in just 9 days with the cities and hundreds of partners.

 

One of the many areas of target: filling the hunger gap for 33,000 students over the 10-day Spring Break holiday in March.

 

The PBC School District School Food Service team asked all principals to pick up pallets in vans, trucks, and SUVs. In just three days, close to 600,000 snacks were handed out at 87 schools at the start of the weeklong break. One student said to a collaborative team member: “Without these snack boxes, we would not have had much to eat.”

 

The collaborative had many other powerful stories, like getting nearly 1,555 Girl Scouts involved in the effort. They learned about hunger and earned a “Drive the Food” badge for feeding 28,000 people people they each researched and chose who to feed locally with 505,000 snacks. One of the troop leaders said: A hungry man “shocked the girls when he sat right down on the spot and cracked open the can of ravioli to eat.”

 

In all, a small army of workers and volunteers from more than 170 organizations answered the call to help and distributed the boxes of food to tens of thousands of hungry residents from across Palm Beach County.

 

It’s another extraordinary example of what happens when nonprofits take the lead in addressing our community’s toughest challenges.

 

If your nonprofit has a great story to tell, contact Charlotte Gill at Nonprofits First: (561) 910-3891 or cgill@nonprofitsfirst.org.

Tags:  Charities  Network  Poverty  Storytelling  Volunteer 

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