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Affiliate Spotlight: AHA! Business Consulting

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Monday, April 22, 2019

1. What is your business name?  

AHA! Business Consulting

 

2.  What do you (or your business) specialize in?

Reducing your employee turnover by helping you to hire right and set your team members up for success.

 

3. How did you get started in consulting?  

Our founder, Andrea Hoffer, started her career in Higher Education Administration, where she worked with college students to help them to develop leadership skills and skills to be successful in the work world.  After 15 years, she left higher ed to open a spa with 35 employees and learned first-hand the challenges of finding and keeping the right team members for your business or organization.  AHA! was originally born out of a need from college campuses looking for an outside consultant to facilitate workshops for their team leadership for the purpose of improving team communication and negotiating change.  Andrea’s unique background in Higher Education and business was a good fit for their needs.  Later, AHA! Business Consulting expanded to working with both nonprofit organizations and for-profit businesses.

 

4. What are you really good at?

We give you the tools and support you need for continued growth and improvement.  Our focus is not just on hiring right or team development.  It is how each piece fits together to create a positive culture and successful team.  Each of our clients have a specific need in mind when they contact us.  We meet them where they are with a service or workshop that will start to address their immediate need, but we don’t just stop there.  Once we begin to understand our client’s long term goals and needs, we become partners in their on-going success.  Each of our clients receive an action plan for next steps we can help them with or simple actions they can take on their own to continue the growth.

 

5. Who are some of your clients?  

Nonprofits First-We have facilitated team workshops for their leadership team.  We also have facilitated an Everything DiSC Workshop for the Rising Leaders the last four years.  The Milagro Center.  Quantum Foundation.  These are some of the nonprofits we have worked with.  We also have worked with for-profit businesses like The Salt Suite, European Wax, Cold Stone Creamery.

 

6. What’s the most unique aspect of what you do?  

We take an educational approach. We teach our clients to fish instead of fishing for them. We provide tools, services and training that our clients can use as they grow and develop their team. 

 

7.  What is your connection to the nonprofit community?  

Our Founder, Andrea, came from the nonprofit world of Higher Education.  She also led a nonprofit theater in Atlanta, GA for a couple of years.  Working with nonprofit organizations has always held a special place in her heart- especially when the organizational mission involves education or the arts.  

 

8. How can organizations best reach you?  

We can be reached at 561.829.5611 or info@ahabusinessconsulting.com.

Tags:  Affiliate Consultant  Cultivate  Leadership  Membership  Professional Development 

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Member Spotlight: Women’s Foundation of Florida & Philanthropy Tank

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Monday, March 25, 2019

Nonprofits First offers many services to the nonprofit community – including the ability to rent space in our West Palm Beach office.

 

Two organizations are taking advantage of that, using our space to maximize the opportunity to be “next door” to our many educational workshops.

 

Those two agencies are: Women’s Foundation of Florida and Philanthropy Tank.

 

They are the focus of our March member spotlight.

 

 

Women’s Foundation of Florida and Philanthropy Tank have different missions, but they have many similarities. They are both small but mighty organizations looking to grow.

 

We asked the staff of both organizations to tell us about their organizations and why they support Nonprofits First.

 

1) Explain briefly how your organization helps people in Palm Beach County/South Florida.

 

Judith Selzer, co-founder and president of Women’s Foundation of Florida: The Women’s Foundation of Florida empowers women and girls to be leaders so we can change the world. Our leadership programs and micro-grants invest in challenging the status quo, lifting up innovative ideas and leaning into the magic of women’s vision for the world around us. Check us out at WomensFoundationFL.org.

 

Mathew Avila, project assistant at Philanthropy Tank: The Philanthropy Tank is an organization that challenges, empowers, and equips the next generation of CHANGEmakers in grades 8-12 to develop and implement a sustainable social service, activism, or entrepreneurship idea that aims to solve a problem in the community.

 

We have over 20 active projects that cover a vast range of topics. One of our 2018 winners, Surface 71, aims to reduce plastic use, improve marine habitats, and advocate that water is life. This past month, Surface 71 successfully lobbied to eliminate plastic straws and stirrers at local businesses and restaurants in West Palm Beach. Their success has even earned them a private tour of the White House and the U.S. Capitol by Senator Marco Rubio.

 

Some of our most recent 2019 winners include groups like the Mayan Girls and Code Autism. The Mayan Girls are a group of young women that translate and market important content relating to health, severe weather, and community updates from English and Spanish to various indigenous Mayan languages in the Lake Worth area. Code Autism is a project that teaches computer programming classes to autistic children from the Els Center for Autism. These are just a fraction of the numerous projects that the Philanthropy Tank has helped support in the past four years. In total, the Philanthropy Tank has impacted over 300,000 lives in Palm Beach County through the various CHANGEmaker programs. Check us out at philanthropytank.org

 

 

2) Why did you decide to be housed in the office of Nonprofits First? What’s the advantage of being there?

 

Judith Selzer: We are thrilled to utilize office space and technical assistance from Nonprofits First because this is an organization that reflects our values and mission. We both believe in public service, leadership and collaboration. It’s a perfect fit!

 

Mathew Avila: The Nonprofits First family recognizes what it takes to construct and maintain an organization that is only starting to bury its roots into the ground. Since the Philanthropy Tank is a young organization, it makes complete sense that we surround ourselves with experienced professionals who know how to develop nonprofits.

 

Over the past two years, the Philanthropy Tank staff has attended numerous informational and collaborative workshops. We walk away with innovative tools and advice from these workshops that make all the difference in the world. The variety of topics covered is endless. Sharing an office with Nonprofits First is a wonderful experience.

 

If your nonprofit has a great story to tell, contact Charlotte Gill at Nonprofits First: 561-910-3891 or cgill@nonprofitsfirst.org.

Tags:  Charities  Collaborations  Cultivate  Leadership  Membership  Nonprofit 

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Member Spotlight: Rising Leaders Class of 2019

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Member Spotlight: Rising Leaders Class of 2019

 

Our nonprofit sector is growing – fast. It’s expanded by as much as 20% during the past 10 years, according to studies.

 

As new and existing organizations expand, a fresh crop of leaders is needed to oversee programs and services as well as manage advocacy, philanthropy, and many other initiatives.

 

Enter Nonprofits First’s Rising Leaders program.

 

We profile our program and meet the new class of 2019 as part of our December member spotlight.

 

 

Rising Leaders has a simple and honorable purpose: prepare nonprofit staff members to lead the organizations and causes that they serve.

 

Our program helps employees gain the next level of personal and professional growth in areas such as human resources, marketing, finances, board governance, and philanthropy.

 

Rising Leaders participants learn leadership skills that set them apart from their peers. They develop a strong understanding of how they can play a critical role in shaping their nonprofits so that they meet their mission and improve our community.

 

Nonprofits need great leaders – especially now.

 

A 2016 study of nonprofits (Nonprofit Salaries & Staffing Report) found more than 50% of the survey respondents reported staff increases, and employees transferring from the for-profit sector were also on the rise as workers looked to nonprofits as a favored place for the next job or to renew a career.

 

Here’s another important data point: After retail and manufacturing, nonprofits employ more people than any other sector, according to Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Economic Data Project. That’s nearly 12 million people working for various social good groups. By comparison, just over 12 million people work in manufacturing, and another 16 million earn paychecks from retail trade.

 

That’s a lot of jobs, and a lot of opportunities to become a leader.

 

We hope members of our new Rising Leaders class will find those opportunities and lead their organizations to do even more good in Palm Beach County and beyond.

 

Introducing the members of our new class:

 

Alexis Howard, Community Aids Network

Brittany Perdigon, Police Athletic League of West Palm Beach

C’jon Armstead, Quantum Foundation

Claudia Harrison, Compass Inc.

Claudia Herrera, Center for Family Services of Palm Beach County, Inc.

Crystal Dole, The Lord's Place Joshua Thrift Store

Dolores Korf, Community Partners

Donna Denney, United Way of Palm Beach County

Hallie Balbuena, Children's Home Society of Florida

Iris Soto, Families First of Palm Beach County

Jacqueline Medina, Pine Ridge Holistic Living Center

Jaime Joshi, Community Partners

Jose Catana Morales, Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League

Kathryn Fant, The Lord’s Place

Kayla Morton, Nonprofits First

Krissy Webb, Student ACES

Leandra Silfa, Adopt-A-Family

Melinda Becker, Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League

Michelle Davis, Boys Town South Florida

Odessa Walker, Housing Partnership (Community Partners)

Rose Newbold, Prime Time Palm Beach County, Inc.

Saidy Garzon, Lake Worth West Resident Planning Group, Inc.

Shakiyla Hart, The Lord’s Place

Shari Waknin-Cohen, Ruth & Norman Rales Jewish Family Services, Inc.

Trinea Freeman Martin, Area Agency on Aging

 

To learn more about our Rising Leaders program, click here.

To watch what past Rising Leaders participants had to say about the program, click here

Tags:  Cultivate  Leadership  Network  Professional Development  Rising Leaders 

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Succession Strategy: Mapping the Next Generation of Leadership

Posted By Josh Hirsch, Tuesday, April 18, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, April 18, 2017

I always find it a little funny when I hear someone say, “The future is now.”

My immediate thought tends to be, “But what does that even mean?” Frankly, it sounds like somebody is trying to be a little too philosophical. I liken it to when someone is sharing “the secret to life,” but really just spewing nonsense.

This common phrase should be shifted to, “The future depends on the now.” Or, as Mahatma Gandhi put it, “The future depends on what you do today.”

This much rings true for your nonprofit organization and the next generation of do-gooders. Succession strategy planning needs to start today. While succession planning sounds intimidating, it simply means putting a plan in place for choosing the new leaders in your organization and giving them the tools they need to succeed.

Take a good, hard look around your organization. These are the people who have your back; these are the people who understand your mission – and they could be the next generation of leaders for your organization.

Set aside time to think about who’s up to the plate and will become that next generation. Murphy’s law states, “anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.” Let’s talk about why we need succession planning, how to do it and the best places to look for new talent.

Why Succession Planning is Vital

In the 2016 Nonprofit Sector Leadership Report, Marc Pitman found that 77 percent, or 3 out of 4 nonprofits, said they did not have formal succession planning in place. This number is insane when you think about all of the aspects you can’t control with leadership leaving or even an expected leave with no formal process in place. Your organization should be alarmed if you don’t have succession planning strategies in place, but also know you’re not alone.

Picture this: your executive director is offered a new position right in the thick of your biggest fundraiser of the year. Without a succession plan in place, that sends your organization into full-on crisis mode.

Do you think you’d stop the fundraiser to find an executive director? Absolutely not. Do you think funders will ask questions as to why there’s no executive director and what you’re going to do about it? Absolutely.

Maybe you’re convinced your executive director wouldn’t do that to you. Just remember that life happens – spouses get new jobs in different cities, people decide to retire earlier than expected and so on.

Plus, it’s important to remember that succession planning isn’t just about the unexpected happening, although this helps with that. Succession planning is vital because it sets your organization up for years to come. It helps identify potential leaders to ensure a long and healthy life for your organization. Think of it as a wellness program for your nonprofit.

It Takes a Village

Welcome to another episode of “Whose job is it anyway?” Where you’ll need to make everything up, probably come up with a points system for evaluating prospects – and the points will matter. Now that we know why we need succession planning, who needs to step up and make it happen?

Maybe you’re the marketing manager sitting there thinking, “Clearly this article doesn’t apply to me.” Au contraire.

It’s true, the primary party concerned with succession planning is the Board of Directors, our all-powerful governing body. But while board members should be heavily involved in your organization, they simply can’t be involved in every aspect of the day-to-day grind. So if you’re a staff member sitting back thinking you don’t have a part in this process, you’re wrong.

Board members will most likely seek guidance from you. Some boards will even weigh heavily on your opinion. And if you don’t have any succession planning tactics or processes in place, now is the time to approach your board with the concept. Heck, bring this article with you for moral support.

Plus, who do you think is going to be around to train the newbie once they’re hired? Your organization puts itself into a pickle when you rely heavily on one person and nobody else knows how that person does their job.

Where to Start
  • Write Down Job Duties
    A good place to start is to come up with a list of responsibilities and duties from each staff member and board member. Get it all down on paper. Don’t just use the descriptions for the jobs that were posted when you were hired. As you know, positions change and people start to absorb other duties. Try to make these lists as accurate as possible.
  • Talk About It
    I know that nobody loves meetings, but it’s important that once the roles are written down everybody understands who is tackling what. This can be an opportunity to say that you would like to have more responsibilities or put other responsibilities on another team member if it makes more sense. Then you can solidify those job duties.
  • Cross Train on Tasks
    Make sure that at least two people in your organization know how to do every single task. Or, if that isn’t possible, make sure you have detailed instructions on specific tasks so that anybody could pick up the manual and learn.
  • Determine Your Plan
    Talk with your board of directors. Come up with a list of what the ideal executive director would be, the types of skills and traits that person would possess and their past experiences. Outline how you would search for that candidate and how that candidate would be trained.

In an article by Blue Avocado, writers Jan Masaoka and Tim Wilfred perfectly encapsulate the uncertainty of a leadership change by stating:

“More nonprofits are realizing that the executive director transition is a crucial moment in an organization’s life: a moment of great vulnerability as well as great opportunity for transformative change.”

Go out and seize that feeling. Don’t be afraid to be vulnerable because vulnerability means you’re making changes. And whatever you do, don’t put this off. After all, the future depends on the now.

Original post can be found here.

Tags:  Cultivate  Development  Leadership  Nonprofit  Oversight 

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