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Member Spotlight: Rising Leaders Class of 2019

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Member Spotlight: Rising Leaders Class of 2019

 

Our nonprofit sector is growing – fast. It’s expanded by as much as 20% during the past 10 years, according to studies.

 

As new and existing organizations expand, a fresh crop of leaders is needed to oversee programs and services as well as manage advocacy, philanthropy, and many other initiatives.

 

Enter Nonprofits First’s Rising Leaders program.

 

We profile our program and meet the new class of 2019 as part of our December member spotlight.

 

 

Rising Leaders has a simple and honorable purpose: prepare nonprofit staff members to lead the organizations and causes that they serve.

 

Our program helps employees gain the next level of personal and professional growth in areas such as human resources, marketing, finances, board governance, and philanthropy.

 

Rising Leaders participants learn leadership skills that set them apart from their peers. They develop a strong understanding of how they can play a critical role in shaping their nonprofits so that they meet their mission and improve our community.

 

Nonprofits need great leaders – especially now.

 

A 2016 study of nonprofits (Nonprofit Salaries & Staffing Report) found more than 50% of the survey respondents reported staff increases, and employees transferring from the for-profit sector were also on the rise as workers looked to nonprofits as a favored place for the next job or to renew a career.

 

Here’s another important data point: After retail and manufacturing, nonprofits employ more people than any other sector, according to Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Economic Data Project. That’s nearly 12 million people working for various social good groups. By comparison, just over 12 million people work in manufacturing, and another 16 million earn paychecks from retail trade.

 

That’s a lot of jobs, and a lot of opportunities to become a leader.

 

We hope members of our new Rising Leaders class will find those opportunities and lead their organizations to do even more good in Palm Beach County and beyond.

 

Introducing the members of our new class:

 

Alexis Howard, Community Aids Network

Brittany Perdigon, Police Athletic League of West Palm Beach

C’jon Armstead, Quantum Foundation

Claudia Harrison, Compass Inc.

Claudia Herrera, Center for Family Services of Palm Beach County, Inc.

Crystal Dole, The Lord's Place Joshua Thrift Store

Dolores Korf, Community Partners

Donna Denney, United Way of Palm Beach County

Hallie Balbuena, Children's Home Society of Florida

Iris Soto, Families First of Palm Beach County

Jacqueline Medina, Pine Ridge Holistic Living Center

Jaime Joshi, Community Partners

Jose Catana Morales, Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League

Kathryn Fant, The Lord’s Place

Kayla Morton, Nonprofits First

Krissy Webb, Student ACES

Leandra Silfa, Adopt-A-Family

Melinda Becker, Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League

Michelle Davis, Boys Town South Florida

Odessa Walker, Housing Partnership (Community Partners)

Rose Newbold, Prime Time Palm Beach County, Inc.

Saidy Garzon, Lake Worth West Resident Planning Group, Inc.

Shakiyla Hart, The Lord’s Place

Shari Waknin-Cohen, Ruth & Norman Rales Jewish Family Services, Inc.

Trinea Freeman Martin, Area Agency on Aging

 

To learn more about our Rising Leaders program, click here.

To watch what past Rising Leaders participants had to say about the program, click here

Tags:  Cultivate  Leadership  Network  Professional Development  Rising Leaders 

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Member Spotlight: War on Hunger Collaborative

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Tuesday, October 30, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Spotlight on Feeding Palm Beach County’s Hungry Residents

 

People often say that nonprofits work in silos and don’t work well together. This year, the “War on Hunger” collaborative in Palm Beach County proved them wrong.

 

The massive food distribution effort won the 2018 Community Collaboration Award during our Hats Off Nonprofits Awards event in October.

 

So it’s only fitting that we highlight the collaborative in our monthly spotlight on the extraordinary work of nonprofits.

 

Here is the story of how the group reached hundreds of thousands of hunger residents in our community.

 

 

The task was enormous: hand-delivering 3,864,168 snacks, in 214,676 “white boxes,” to nearly 215,000 Palm Beach County residents struggling with poverty and hunger, in a two-month period.

 

It was a job for the military or another big government agency, right?

 

No, this was done locally by a collaboration of 19 key public, private, and nonprofit organizations with the clear goal of feeding every hungry child, adult and senior in Palm Beach County during the spring of 2018.

 

The massive outreach effort started when Farm Share alerted Living Hungry, a West Palm Beach-based group fighting hunger, to the fact that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was looking for agencies to accept 100 truckloads of expiring “hurricane-shelter snack boxes.” If the food was accepted, it would need to be distributed fast to avoid the expiration date of July.

 

“We are going to need more partners, more people!” Maura Plante, founder of Living Hungry, said at the time.

 

And so, Plante contacted Palm Beach County School Board Member Erica Whitfield, along with other public sector organizations including Houston Tate and Ruth Morguillansky from the Palm Beach County Office of Community Revitalization who recruited the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office. Together, with Michael Farver, South Florida Hunger Coalition they followed a creative, strategic planning process and set out to build an outreach collaborative, with each partner playing a specific, mission-critical role.

 

The “War on Hunger” collaborative, as it became known, also involved: Nonprofits First, Sysco Southeast Florida, Restoration Bridge, Daughters of the American Revolution, The Palm Beach Post, Cox Media, The Girl Scouts of Southeast Florida, Glades Initiative, and ARC of the Glades, as well as other organizations from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors with support from the Everglades Trust. Additionally, many municipalities helped out with logistics and distribution, including City of Riviera Beach, City of Delray Beach, and cities of Belle Glade, South Bay and Pahokee.

 

Together, they engaged dozens of local charities, churches, agencies, businesses, girl scout troops, civic groups, service providers, organizations, school principals, teachers, coaches, police officers, and neighbors to get the food out. The Palm Beach County Office of Community Revitalization distributed 2.2 million meals in just 9 days with the cities and hundreds of partners.

 

One of the many areas of target: filling the hunger gap for 33,000 students over the 10-day Spring Break holiday in March.

 

The PBC School District School Food Service team asked all principals to pick up pallets in vans, trucks, and SUVs. In just three days, close to 600,000 snacks were handed out at 87 schools at the start of the weeklong break. One student said to a collaborative team member: “Without these snack boxes, we would not have had much to eat.”

 

The collaborative had many other powerful stories, like getting nearly 1,555 Girl Scouts involved in the effort. They learned about hunger and earned a “Drive the Food” badge for feeding 28,000 people people they each researched and chose who to feed locally with 505,000 snacks. One of the troop leaders said: A hungry man “shocked the girls when he sat right down on the spot and cracked open the can of ravioli to eat.”

 

In all, a small army of workers and volunteers from more than 170 organizations answered the call to help and distributed the boxes of food to tens of thousands of hungry residents from across Palm Beach County.

 

It’s another extraordinary example of what happens when nonprofits take the lead in addressing our community’s toughest challenges.

 

If your nonprofit has a great story to tell, contact Charlotte Gill at Nonprofits First: (561) 910-3891 or cgill@nonprofitsfirst.org.

Tags:  Charities  Network  Poverty  Storytelling  Volunteer 

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Develop Your Own Self

Posted By Shari Jennings, Monday, July 11, 2016
Updated: Thursday, July 7, 2016

Finding funds for professional development can be a challenge in nonprofit organizations.  We often work with limited resources to accomplish a seemingly unlimited number of tasks.  For the mid-level professional, this becomes a barrier to getting the professional development needed to move to the next level.  This is why you need to develop yourself.  One way to do this is to volunteer.  Nonprofits like FREE anything, but especially free labor.  Seek volunteer opportunities outside of your organization.  Volunteering and doing a good job demonstrates your leadership skills and makes you more marketable.

Volunteering is a form of networking, which is also important when developing yourself.  Join professional groups and organizations, become a board member, and/or join a peer networking group.  Seek opportunities to form relationships with likeminded professionals.  Develop genuine relationships where information is shared.  Don’t just reach out to people when you need something.  Share information, send an article.  These relationships create connections, increase confidence, and generate referrals.  

Remember that you are responsible for your career.  Sometimes the opportunity to grow comes knocking at your door, but when it does not, you have to develop your own self!

Here at Nonprofits First, we offer development opportunities to new and experienced professionals who have that desire to move to the next level in their career. For more information, visit our Education & Professional Development page.

Tags:  Network  Professional Development  Volunteer 

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