Nonprofits First
News & Press
Blog Home All Blogs

Member Spotlight: Center for Child Counseling and Brandstory Communications

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Tuesday, July 30, 2019
Updated: Thursday, July 18, 2019

Affiliate Consultants provide support to the nonprofit community - one innovative project at a time. Search the directory to find experienced consultants for your nonprofit's needs. This month we're sharing tips on how to use videos as a storytelling tool to reach more people.

It’s our July Member spotlight! Read on to hear from Brandstory Communication and their award-winning video work for the Center for Child Counseling.

---

Nonprofits First: Gary Widom of Brandstory Communications and the Center for Child Counseling teamed up to create an award-winning video. Congratulations on the 2019 Telly Award. How did you help the Center for Child Counseling tell their story in this video?

Brandstory Communications: People who are involved in the mental health field know that the Center for Child Counseling (CfCC) does amazing work helping kids and their parents identify, understand, and heal from Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Our goal was to produce a video explaining what ACEs are and how the CFCC works to create a trauma-informed community.

Tip #1 Define Your Audience!

The first step was to sit-down with Renée Layman, the organization’s Chief Executive Officer, for insight into the target audience of the video. For instance, are we talking to an everyday person who has no knowledge of the topic or are we talking to someone who has a mental health background? Once you determine your audience you can more clearly define the narrative.

Tip #2: Stay Singularly Focused!

The second point, I can't stress enough, is that it’s always better to focus on one main topic per video. Don’t try to cram a bunch of topics in a single piece of content if they are all closely related. Videos that have multiple topics are going to be too long to hold someone’s attention and if you try to keep it short, you are able to most effectively cut information that may make the video confusing.

Tip #3: Location, Location, Location!

After you know what story you’re telling it’s time to get organized. Make a list of your shoot locations.  Who you are interviewing?  What is their role? We want to know what video can we shoot in each location as it helps to best frame the story narrative. If you know one of the interviews will be about something that has happened in the past (where no fresh video can be produced), find supporting pictures or home video to incorporate. Any content collected before production helps to frame that key and unique narrative by framing how interviews will be conducted and what the video/pictures will be needed. The right locations and proper visuals will cue the viewer into your overall message.

Nonprofits First: How was this partnership a win/win for affiliate and nonprofit?

Brandstory Communications: Our team prides itself on the ability to tell stories through video. We passionately commit to this work in an effective & efficient way for our clients with our staff that consists of award-winning journalists & videographers with four decades of storytelling experience. We believe that every business and organization has multiple interesting stories to tell. It has been our experience that many of the best stories are those we tell for our long-list of nonprofit clients, including the Center for Child Counseling. 

Nonprofits First: What advice would you give nonprofits about story telling or choosing the right producer for their videos?

Brandstory Communications: With modern video and smartphone cameras there is a general belief that good looking videos are easy to shoot. It depends on your goals and use of those videos. What’s not fast and easy is conceptualizing, asking the right questions during an interview, crafting a story, and producing a quality and quantity of videos that is needed for our world of mobile/online consumers, donors, and service recipients.  When looking for a company to shoot videos make sure you’ve seen some of their work and it’s similar to something you’re looking for. Good video content producers are more than people who can press play, focus, edit and properly light an interview. Ask around as to a company’s consistency of meeting deadlines. Does the company understand the overall marketing and messaging that the video will contribute to? Consistent and quality video production has become one of the most powerful tools for modern day marketing. Your organization has impactful stories. The videos that tell those stories should positively impact the reputation and level of our organization’s brand awareness.

Nonprofits First: So can we see the video?

Brandstory Communications: Of course! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrpgVwDvbDE

Tags:  Affiliate Consultant  Membership  Nonprofit  Storytelling  Video 

Share |
Permalink
 

Nonprofits First Brings Two Groups Together to Provide Students With Computers

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Monday, June 24, 2019

Krissy Webb was in a bind.

 

She runs a nonprofit, Student ACES (ACE), that helps high school athletes become better people through character education programs. Her organization was building a new academic, health and wellness center in the Glades -- thanks to a building donation from Bank of America -- and the center needed computers for the students.

 

Where could ACE get dozens of computers – ideally for free?

 

The solution came when Krissy spoke with Jessica Cecere, CEO of Nonprofits First, who suggested Krissy contact Adrian Abedon, the brainchild behind DinoTech Foundation, which refurbishes computers for disadvantaged students.

 

Krissy talked to Adrian, a high school student in Boca Raton, and just like that ACE had desktop and laptop computers for their students.

 

“Next thing you know, my car is filled with computers and there will be hundreds of high school students who will have the opportunity to use computers for their academic growth,” Krissy said.

 

It was an ideal collaboration between two local nonprofit organizations, and Nonprofits First made the connection.

 

“I had reached out to Jessica to see if she knew of anyone who was getting rid of computers and boom -- Adrian and I are connected and these students will now have an incredible computer lab,” Krissy said.

 

Krissy added: “Nonprofits First is always my go-to for advice and connections, they are the experts and are always there to support growth and capacity of Student ACES. We have been members for four years and they are an incredible-resource in our community. Jessica and team are always there to assist.”

 

Learn more about Student ACES here.

 

Learn more about DinoTech Foundation here

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  Collaborations  Membership  Nonprofit  Storytelling 

Share |
PermalinkComments (2)
 

Member Spotlight: The Guatemalan-Maya Center and Achieve

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Tuesday, May 28, 2019

The recent Great Give was a boon for The Guatemalan-Maya Center (accredited nonprofit organization and member), which brought in nearly $40,000 during the one-day fundraising event.

 

The organization worked with the marketing company Achieve (our affiliate member) in raising the money through social media, e-blasts, and a string of volunteers.

 

How did they do it?

 

We asked Erica Linguanti, Achieve’s director of marketing, to explain their strategies for the campaign – and describe how similar strategies can help other nonprofits in various fundraising efforts.

 

It’s our May Member spotlight.

 

 

1) How did Achieve help The Guatemalan-Maya Center raise $38,787 during the Great Give?

 

Erica Linguanti: We developed a multi-channel campaign strategy to help The Guatemalan-Maya Center meet their goal of raising $30,000 to expand their after school program. Here are some of the key tactics we used to support our overall strategy:

 

1. Identified a clear/realistic fundraising goal. In the case of The Guatemalan-Maya Center, instead of simply having a monetary goal, we equated the goal to the impact: “Help 30 kids succeed in school this year.”

 

2. Updated their website to be mobile responsive and implemented a new donation platform for pre and post donations. It was important that their donation tool was both mobile friendly and trackable through Facebook conversion tracking.

 

3. Developed an email messaging strategy to leverage storytelling before, during, and after the Great Give to encourage support.

 

4. Utilized both paid and organic social media to generate awareness and garner donations. Paid social advertising was especially critical because it allowed us to leverage a variety of retargeting tactics to best reach our key audiences. To really succeed on social you can’t rely on a few organic posts anymore. On Facebook, typically only about 1-3% of your followers will ever organically see your content - and it usually takes at least 5-7 messaging “touch points” before a user will ever consider taking action. For better or worse, Facebook (and Instagram) have become very pay-to-play platforms making your organic social strategy only as effective as your paid social strategy (and vice versa).

 

5. Created phone scripts volunteers could use to reach out to past donors and encourage participation in the Great Give. Sometimes accomplishing fundraising goals takes a village, so we wanted to setup volunteers for success!

 

2) Was there anything during the Great Give event that didn’t go as planned?

 

Erica Linguanti: Initially we were unable to secure a donor match - which was a key tactic in our overall strategy. After this setback, we pivoted to a new messaging strategy. Then, a little over one week before the Great Give, our plans changed again after a $5,000 donor match was secured. While we were thrilled to have a match to help incentivize donors, the last-minute match meant we needed to change our messaging strategy again. With any type of marketing campaign, it’s important to remain flexible! 

 

3) What advice would you give other nonprofits about raising money during the Great Give or other events?

 

Erica Linguanti: The biggest pieces of advice I would give to other nonprofits looking to raise money during the Great Give (or other pinnacle events) would be to:

 

1. Start early! #GivingTuesday is coming in November. Ideally, you should be planning your strategy no later than July/August.

 

2. Keep your goal(s) simple and tangible. It also helps to humanize your ask by attaching money to actual impact. For example, with The Guatemalan-Maya Center, our goal was to “Help 30 kids succeed in school this year” vs. “Help us raise $30,000.”

 

3. Leverage paid social media advertising to extend your digital reach and get in front of new audiences.

 

4. Remember that for “day of giving” events - it’s not just about the amount of money raised. Giving days are great opportunities to bring in new donors for your organization that you can cultivate over time (and hopefully turn into loyal donors).

 

Learn more about The Guatemalan-Maya Center here.

 

Learn more about Achieve here.

 

If your nonprofit has a great story to tell, contact Charlotte Gill at Nonprofits First: 561-910-3891 or cgill@nonprofitsfirst.org.

Tags:  Affiliate Consultant  Charitable Giving  Charities  Collaborations  Fundraising  Membership  Nonprofit  Nonprofit Philanthropy 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Member Spotlight: Women’s Foundation of Florida & Philanthropy Tank

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Monday, March 25, 2019

Nonprofits First offers many services to the nonprofit community – including the ability to rent space in our West Palm Beach office.

 

Two organizations are taking advantage of that, using our space to maximize the opportunity to be “next door” to our many educational workshops.

 

Those two agencies are: Women’s Foundation of Florida and Philanthropy Tank.

 

They are the focus of our March member spotlight.

 

 

Women’s Foundation of Florida and Philanthropy Tank have different missions, but they have many similarities. They are both small but mighty organizations looking to grow.

 

We asked the staff of both organizations to tell us about their organizations and why they support Nonprofits First.

 

1) Explain briefly how your organization helps people in Palm Beach County/South Florida.

 

Judith Selzer, co-founder and president of Women’s Foundation of Florida: The Women’s Foundation of Florida empowers women and girls to be leaders so we can change the world. Our leadership programs and micro-grants invest in challenging the status quo, lifting up innovative ideas and leaning into the magic of women’s vision for the world around us. Check us out at WomensFoundationFL.org.

 

Mathew Avila, project assistant at Philanthropy Tank: The Philanthropy Tank is an organization that challenges, empowers, and equips the next generation of CHANGEmakers in grades 8-12 to develop and implement a sustainable social service, activism, or entrepreneurship idea that aims to solve a problem in the community.

 

We have over 20 active projects that cover a vast range of topics. One of our 2018 winners, Surface 71, aims to reduce plastic use, improve marine habitats, and advocate that water is life. This past month, Surface 71 successfully lobbied to eliminate plastic straws and stirrers at local businesses and restaurants in West Palm Beach. Their success has even earned them a private tour of the White House and the U.S. Capitol by Senator Marco Rubio.

 

Some of our most recent 2019 winners include groups like the Mayan Girls and Code Autism. The Mayan Girls are a group of young women that translate and market important content relating to health, severe weather, and community updates from English and Spanish to various indigenous Mayan languages in the Lake Worth area. Code Autism is a project that teaches computer programming classes to autistic children from the Els Center for Autism. These are just a fraction of the numerous projects that the Philanthropy Tank has helped support in the past four years. In total, the Philanthropy Tank has impacted over 300,000 lives in Palm Beach County through the various CHANGEmaker programs. Check us out at philanthropytank.org

 

 

2) Why did you decide to be housed in the office of Nonprofits First? What’s the advantage of being there?

 

Judith Selzer: We are thrilled to utilize office space and technical assistance from Nonprofits First because this is an organization that reflects our values and mission. We both believe in public service, leadership and collaboration. It’s a perfect fit!

 

Mathew Avila: The Nonprofits First family recognizes what it takes to construct and maintain an organization that is only starting to bury its roots into the ground. Since the Philanthropy Tank is a young organization, it makes complete sense that we surround ourselves with experienced professionals who know how to develop nonprofits.

 

Over the past two years, the Philanthropy Tank staff has attended numerous informational and collaborative workshops. We walk away with innovative tools and advice from these workshops that make all the difference in the world. The variety of topics covered is endless. Sharing an office with Nonprofits First is a wonderful experience.

 

If your nonprofit has a great story to tell, contact Charlotte Gill at Nonprofits First: 561-910-3891 or cgill@nonprofitsfirst.org.

Tags:  Charities  Collaborations  Cultivate  Leadership  Membership  Nonprofit 

Share |
Permalink
 

Member Spotlight: Center for Child Counseling

Posted By Charlotte Gill, Tuesday, February 26, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, February 27, 2019

February Member Spotlight: Center for Child Counseling

 

The Center for Child Counseling is on a roll lately– they’ve won major grants, a Hats Off Award, and many other accolades for their work in improving the social-emotional wellness of children and their families in Palm Beach County.

The recent successes are the result of a lunch meeting in 2013, and the hard work that followed and continues today.

The Center’s story is our February Member Spotlight. 

 

The Center for Child Counseling has received a lot of attention as of late – and deservedly so.

 

In October, the agency won Nonprofit of the Year (Medium) at the 2018 Hats Off Nonprofit Awards. In November, they were one of 16 nonprofits selected to receive a grant from New York Life to provide trauma and grief support to those who have experienced devastation or loss. And in February, they won $100,000 from Impact the Palm Beaches.

 

Overseeing all of this is CEO Renée Layman, MS, LMHC. She manages a staff of more than 10 people and their work in helping more than 1,500 children and their caregivers. Layman has more than 20 years of experience in mental health services, most of which are specific to children’s mental health.

 

She’s had the job since 2013 when she and the organization’s founder, Jane Robinson, met over lunch and Robinson offered Layman the opportunity to take over the group (then called All ‘Bout Children) and take it to the next level. Layman accepted and, with Robinson’s guidance and feedback, teamed up with infant mental health specialist Lauren Scirrotto, LMHC, to develop the foundation for the next chapter of the agency, starting with the new name, Center for Child Counseling.

 

Both women had a vision for a supportive, transparent, and compassionate workplace that enabled staff to thrive while they helped the most vulnerable populations in Palm Beach County heal from trauma and toxic stress. Layman and Scirrotto, often sitting face-to-face, developed policies and procedures with a clear focus on what they wanted the agency to accomplish: building the foundation for playful, healthful, and hopeful living for children and families.  

 

Through prevention, early intervention, and targeted treatment, the staff focused on creating a “trauma-informed” community where all partners (schools, criminal justice system, shelters, health care providers, and many other professionals and institutions) worked closely to identify and heal the effects of toxic stress and trauma before they developed into damaging behaviors.

 

The goal also was to shift from asking “what’s wrong with you?” to “what happened to you” and “how can we help?”

 

Over time, the Center for Child Counseling did just that, and today it’s focused on three key areas:

 

  • Improving the social-emotional wellness of children and their caregivers by providing an array of prevention, early intervention, and mental health services.
  • Improving caregivers' mental health and use of effective strategies to support children, while strengthening their ability to provide an environment that promotes healthy outcomes.
  • Training professionals and the community on effective clinical models and trauma-informed strategies for working with children and families.

 

How does all of that fit together?

 

A staggering 1 in 4 children live in poverty in Palm Beach County, putting them at risk for an array of experiences that can change the structure of the developing brain.

 

Some organization has to fill critical gaps in the system of care to address urgent needs of those children and their families.

 

That organization is the Center for Child Counseling.

 

 

Contact the Center for Child Counseling by calling 561-244-9499 or emailing info@centerforchildcounseling.org.

 

If your nonprofit has a great story to tell, contact Charlotte Gill at Nonprofits First: (561) 910-3891 or cgill@nonprofitsfirst.org.

Tags:  Membership  Nonprofit  Storytelling 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 3
1  |  2  |  3
 


Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal